Appendix G: Slip Resistant Characteristics of Ground and Floor Finishes

Download a printable version of this section
Legend
Extremely low Potential for slipping is extremely low (most preferred surface)
Low Potential for slipping is low
Moderate to Low Potential for slipping is moderate to low
Moderate Potential for slipping is moderate
High Potential for slipping is high (least preferred surface)
Potential for slip of floor and tread finishes (Source:BSI BS5395 Part 1)
Surface Material Potential for Slip Remarks
Dry and Unpolished Wet
Carpet Extremely low Low

Loose or worn carpets can present a trip hazard. Thick carpet is unsuitable for wheelchair movement

Cast Iron Low Moderate to low If open treads are used, the potential for slip can be low in wet conditions
Ceramic Tiles (glazed or highly polished) Low High No remarks
Ceramic Tiles (matte) Low Moderate to low Wet slip potential is dependent on surface roughness. An Rz (din) value greater than 10 µm should be used for clean-water wet areas
Clay Pavers Extremely low Low Brick Development Association can advise [See footnote 1]
Clay Tiles Low Moderate to low When surface is wet and polished, the potential for slip can be very high
Clay Tiles (carborundum finish) Extremely low Extremely low Might be suitable for exterior stairs
Clay Tiles (textured) Extremely low Low Might be suitable for exterior stairs
Concrete Low Moderate to low If textured finish or a non-slip aggregate is used, potential for slip can be low
Concrete (powerfloat finish) Low Moderate Surface dust can cause problems, particularly on new floors
Concrete Pavers (interlock) Low Low No remarks
Cork tiles Extremely low Low No remarks
Float Glass Extremely low High Various techniques can be used to modify the surface of float glass, thus improving the wet potential for slip. Expert advice should be sought
Granolithic Low Moderate to low Slip-resistant inserts are necessary whenever granolithic is used for stair treads. Slip- resistance may be improved by incorporating a carborundum finish. Polished granolithic should not be used for stair treads.
GRP, profiled (chequer plate) Not determined Low Class determined by ramp method, water-wet with shod feet. No dry value determined
Linoleum Low Moderate to low Edges of sheet liable to cause tripping if not fixed firmly to base
Marble/Granite Low High Slip-resistance when wet and polished is very poor
Mastic Asphalt Low Low No remarks
Profiled Ceramics Low Moderate to low Profiled ceramics are suitable for use in barefoot areas. In shod-foot situations, the comment for matte ceramic tiles applies
PVC Low High to moderate Ex-factory classes for PVC should be treated with caution. The installed floor is unlikely to be suitable for use in wet conditions. Slip-resistance when wet may be improved if PVC is textured. Edges of sheet liable to cause tripping if not firmly fixed to base.
PVC, enhanced slip-resistance Low Low The anti-slip properties depend upon sufficient, uniformly distributed aggregate. Areas of reduced aggregate can present a serious slip hazard
Resin, enhanced slip resistance Extremely low Low The anti-slip properties depend upon sufficient, uniformly distributed aggregate. Areas of reduced aggregate can present a serious slip hazard
Resin, smooth, self-levelling Extremely low High to moderate No remarks
Rubber (sheets or tiles) Extremely low High Not suitable near entrance doors or other foreseeable wet areas
Resin, smooth, self-levelling Extremely low High to moderate No remarks
Rubber (sheets or tiles) Extremely low High Not suitable near entrance doors or other foreseeable wet areas
Rubber, smooth and ribbed Low High No remarks
Stainless Steel Low High Wet slip potential is highly dependent on surface finish. Quoted values for 0.5 µm Rz (din) surface roughness
Steel Profiled (diamond plate) Not determined Moderate Class determined by DIN ramp method. No dry value determined
Terrazzo Low High to moderate Slip-resistant inserts are necessary whenever terrazzo is used for stair treads. Polished terrazzo (including resin based) should not be used for stair treads
Vinyl Tiles Low Moderate No remarks
Wood (finished) Extremely low High Applies to sealed, varnished or polished timber
Wood (unfinished) Low Moderate No remarks

Footnote 1: Brick Development Association, Woodside House, Winkfield, Windsor, Berkshire, S1A 2DX, England

Notes:

  1. The information in this Table has been drawn from CSA Standards B651-12 Accessible Design for the Built Environment and from more recent research by Great Britain’s Health and Safety Executive. It is further supplemented with information from a proposed new appendix to the Ontario Building Code: Proposed Change to 2006 OBC; change number B-03-04-01; code reference B.3.4.6.1 (1)(a) & (c)
  2. The Table is intended only as a guide. Depending on the precise nature of the wearing surface, seemingly similar products made from the same material can be totally different in terms of their slip-potential characteristics. It is especially important to be aware that many products will change significantly merely on installation. Wear, usage, contamination, cleaning and maintenance regimes will all affect the performance of the product over its lifetime.
  3. This Table is included for information and is not comprehensive.

 

Illustrated Technical Guide to the Design of Public Spaces