2.3.1 Beach Access Routes

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The Requirements in this Section apply to:
Government of Ontario, Legislative Assembly, and Designated Public Sector Organizations Private / Not-for-Profit Sector Organizations
Large Small
Yes Yes Yes

This section outlines the requirements that are specific to beach access routes. Requirements are provided for both constructed and non-constructed beach access routes. A constructed beach access route is one that is built on-site, and might consist of materials such as concrete, wood boards or well-compacted crushed gravel. A non-constructed beach access route is a manufactured product that is brought to the site and laid in place. Such systems are typically put in place on a seasonal basis.

Application

The requirements in this Section apply to newly constructed and redeveloped beach access routes, whether permanent or temporary, that an organization intends to maintain.

Requirements for the Design of Beach Access Routes

For both constructed and not constructed beach access routes:

Entry points
Entrances must have a minimum clear width of 1,000 mm through any gate, bollard or other entry element.
Clear width
Minimum 1,000 mm.
Clear height
Minimum of 2,100 mm head room clearance above the beach access route.
Surface
Firm and stable.
Running slope
Maximum 1:10 (10%)

For constructed beach access routes:

Cross slope
Maximum 1:50 (2%)
Changes in level
Refer to Table 2.3.1
  • Where routes have changes in level between 6 mm and 13 mm, the changes in level must be Definition:bevelled, sloped no steeper than 1:2 (50%).
  • Where routes have changes in level between 14 mm and 200 mm, the changes in level must be sloped with a running slope no steeper than 1:10 (10%).
  • Where routes have changes in level greater than 200 mm, the changes on level shall be designed as ramps, in accordance with Section 2.3.3 Ramps in Beach Access Routes.
Table 2.3.1 Requirements for Changes in Level along Constructed Beach Access Routes.
Change in Level (height) Slope Requirements
1 - 5 mm No bevel required
6 - 13 mm Must be bevelled with a maximum ratio of 1:2 (50)% for every 1 unit of height, at least two units of length)
14 - 200 mm Running slope not steeper than 1:10 (10%) or provide a curb ramp (see Section 2.1.6)
greater than 200 mm Provide a ramp (see section 2.1.2)
Surface openings
Openings in the surface of beach access routes must not allow the passage of an object more than 20 mm in diameter. Position elongated openings approximately perpendicular to the direction of travel.

For non-constructed beach access routes:

Cross slope
Maximum cross slope must be the minimum slope required for drainage.

Better Practice Considerations

Permanent solutions are recommended over temporary ones, such as mats, so that organizations do not have to store them in the offseason.

Surface
Consider choosing slipresistant surfaces such as asphalt or well-compacted, crushed limestone screenings. For slip resistance values, refer to Appendix G.

For both constructed and not constructed beach access routes:

Entry points
Entrances to beach access routes should be maintained clear of obstructions such as trees or rocks, that could reduce the width.
Clear height
Consider providing a minimum of 2,300 mm head room clearance above beach access route surfaces where tree growth could reduce head room.
Clear width
Consider a width of 1,800 mm to allow wheelchairs and scooters to comfortably pass. If the route is less than 1,800 mm wide, consider providing 1,800 mm x 1,800 mm passing/turn-around spaces, spaced no more than 30 metres apart to minimize the distance someone in a mobility aid needs to back if up if they encounter someone else in a mobility aid.
Running slope
Gentle running slopes are recommended, to minimize the amount of strength and stamina required to use the route.
Cross slope
Gentle cross slopes are recommended to provide an even surface, to maximize the usability of the route for people who use strollers, wheelchairs, walkers, and other mobility aids, as well as for people with poor balance.

For constructed beach access routes:

Surface openings
Consider openings that do not allow the passage of an object more than 12 mm in diameter, to further reduce the possibility of small wheels, cane tips and shoe heels getting caught in openings, grilles and gratings.
Changes in level
Minimize level changes as much as possible — continuous surfaces are more accessible and safer for everyone to use.
Level stopping places
Consider providing landings or level stopping places where possible along sloped routes longer than 30 metres, to allow users to stop and recover their stamina.
Horizontal openings
Consider a maximum of 12 mm, preferably perpendicular to the direction of travel, as wheels, heels, walking sticks, etc., are less likely to get caught in the openings.

 

Illustrated Technical Guide to the Design of Public Spaces